Eight Tips for Selecting Your Painting Contractor

Published: 02nd October 2009
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Even though painting is a simple trade, there is little a homeowner can do to overcome the effects of a bad paint job other than strip, seal and repaint. Unfortunately, just like in any other trade, there are good and bad painting contractors. As the homeowner, you obviously want to make sure you hire a good one.

How can you tell the difference? You can't just take their word for it. However, there are some definite red flags, as well as definite steps to take. Here are some tips that every homeowner should know when working with a painting contractor:

1. The more information you have before hiring a painting contractor, the better off you are, and it's amazing what kind of information you can find on the Internet now days. Visiting the contractor's website will give you useful information about how they work, what they value and how long they've been in business. As well, their website and physical business can help you get a sense of their professionalism.

2. Use painters that work with first class paints. To accommodate various price points, most manufacturers produce paints ranging in quality from high to low. Homeowners should specify that the highest quality paint is to be used on their job. Low-grade paint will bubble, peel and crack. In addition, few low-grade paints take well to washing and will quickly wear away; you'll need to repaint much sooner than with high quality paint.

3. Your painter should allow you to choose any brand of paint. If they don't have experience using your favorite brand of paint, be wary. If the painter has a reason for not using a particular type or brand of paint, ask questions and have them explain why.

4. Make sure the painter is licensed and insured. Ask for valid proof of that license and insurance; do not accept copies! If they have no physical proof, ask where they've been licensed and insured, and then call the companies to verify. You have almost no recourse against an unlicensed painter.

5. Never work with a painting contractor without a business address or that will only work for cash. This includes contractors that offer discounts if paid in cash or those that demand payment in advance. Legitimate contractors will accept other forms of payment and have a business address. As well, they expect either no payment or only a down payment until the project is finished. Discuss payment arrangements before hiring a contractor.

6. Get written estimates and contracts. Make sure you read the contract and bring up any questions directly with the painter. The contracts, guarantees or warranties should include information on how they would handle any issues that may arise, and what types of issues are covered.

7. Never shop for a paint job on the basis of price alone. The lowest bidder is rarely the best value for you. Also, look for an established contractor who has been in business for many years and has a good reputation in your community.

8. Develop a good working relationship with your painting contractor. You are about to have a group of people around your house for some time. Make sure you feel comfortable that your contractor will protect you and your property.

Using a good, licensed painting contractor to paint your house isn't always the cheapest way to go. Depending on your area, it might be a little more expensive than you really want it to be. The cost for someone who isn't licensed, however, may be more expensive than you EVER want it to be by the time everything is said and done. A respected painting contractor will produce fantastic results that are well worth the cost.Looking for a los angeles painter company who offers you more than just a professional painter, but an honest experienced friend in the painting business. At All Los Angeles Painting Company.com, we work closely with interior designers and general contractors, ensuring the best possible results for you. Our experienced painters guarantee clean, prompt service. Visit online today.

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